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Composer Biography: Edmund Jolliffe

Edmund Jolliffe has always had a passion for music, studying piano from an early age, but it was when participating in a composition competition at school that he discovered his true calling. ‘I was so excited about the idea of creating music, even though I was only twelve, that from then on my goal was to become a composer.’

Inspired, he wrote as much music as he could, whenever he could, exploring the unfamiliar and soaking up anything new to him: from Stravinsky to Sondheim, minimalism to film music.

Jolliffe went on to study music at Oxford University, before completing a Masters in Film Composition at the Royal College of Music, working under Joseph Horovitz and Academy Award winning-composer Dario Marianelli.

His professional scoring work has largely been in the field of documentaries, with notable credits including: Who Do You Think You Are? (BBC), Unreported World (Channel 4), Long Lost Family and The Great War: The People’s Story (ITV). Jolliffe's more recent work has included writing the music for entertainment shows, such as Homestead Rescue (Discovery) and My Kitchen Rules (SKY.)

Much of Jolliffe's work has been in conjunction with long standing collaborators, who benefit form his versatility and readiness to embrace sound design and creative studio techniques. When combined with his classical training, it is this that gives him his creative style.

Who Do You Think You Are? - Larry Lamb
The Great War - The Peoples Story - Credits


The Queen at 90 - A Family Tribute - Trailer

Outside of film and television scoring Jolliffe continues to write music for the concert hall, for which he has won a number of awards. Much of his choral music is published by OUP and Stainer and Bell, and is frequently performed around the world. He also recently contributed to a collection of beginner piano pieces for Associated Board of the Royal Schools of Music (ABRSM.)

Jolliffe states that his approach to writing for de Wolfe is always to explore new territory. ‘Each album starts with a few ideas which I play around with and mould until I have a whole album that I am happy with. I like the challenge of composing in different styles of music, discovering new sounds and pushing myself in new directions.’

Edmund has written three albums for de Wolfe music, with a fourth in development. You can listen to them below: Life And Times, a beautifully recorded light orchestral album of emotive music perfect for heartfelt and real life documentaries; Culture & History: Eastern Europe, an artistic album of evocative, characterful orchestral music with influences from Eastern Europe past and present; and Musical Reflections, featuring themes for love, loss and emotion.